What Makes DynaPier® the Best Foundation Pier?

For many homeowners choosing the best foundation pier can be an overwhelming decision. They need to choose the best pier to support their house, and stay within their budget. But without a deep knowledge of foundation piers, it can be confusing to determine the strongest one. We compared the DynaPier® Foundation Piering System to other common piering systems. When compared to any other foundation piering system, the DynaPier® wins in engineering, strength & durability, which is why our foundation piers come with a lifetime warranty. Below is a quick list of facts for each piering system.

DynaPier®

  • What Makes DynaPier the Best Foundation Pier?The piers are constructed of steel filled with high-strength concrete, making for an extremely strong pier. We combine the strength of steel and concrete to create a super pier. Most other piers on the market are constructed of either steel or concrete, not both. Advantage DynaPier®.
  • Loads are transferred through a single vertical axis which alleviates any fail points.
  • Our solid bar stock spacer systems, shims are contained within the pier cap, which allows no shifting when the soil expands and contracts.
  • Our .217 wall pipe along with 8,000 psi concrete, gives our system extreme strength.
  • The piers are pressed to the point of resistance.

Offset Steel Pier

  • The load doesn’t transfer directly onto the pier which means that the spot right under the brace is vulnerable to breaking. It wants to buckle under pressure.
  • The steel bracket has up to a four inch offset, therefore there is potential for buckling directly beneath the brace.
  • The steel tubing is hollow, and not nearly as strong as the DynaPier® that is filled with concrete.
  • This system requires large excavating equipment, that can be very invasive to the homeowner’s property and can cause damage to the lawn, landscaping, etc.

Concrete Piling

  • They are friction piers not end-loaded piers, which means they rely on the soil to create friction and press against them to hold them in place. The problem with this system, is as the soil gets wet or dries out, it will expand and contract causing it to lose friction and it will fail. This is a very common problem with these types of piers.
  • The shims are not contained, so slight movements in the soil can make the shims misalign and cause additional settlement.
  • Often times the concrete shim sections are intentionally broken onsite with a hammer, this creates an uneven surface that allows for very little contact between the steel shim and the concrete block.

Drilled Concrete Pier

  • The angle of the shaft is not completely vertical, compromising durability.
  • The piers are drilled to a fixed depth, not necessarily the right depth.
  • They are friction piers not end-loaded piers, so they rely on the soil to create friction and press against them to hold them in place. The problem is as soil gets wet and dries out, it will expand and contract causing it to lose friction and it will fail. This is a very common problem with these types of piers.
  • They require a longer than necessary project duration. First, the holes must be drilled, then the concrete needs to be poured, the project is then put on hold for two weeks for the concrete to cure to raise the house.
  • This system requires large excavating equipment, that can be very invasive to the homeowner’s property and can cause damage to the lawn, landscaping, etc.